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Beacon Theatre Night Four: Recap, Photos & Set List!

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  • May 26, 2013
    Beacon Theatre Night Four: Recap, Photos & Set List!

    The fourth night of the Beacon residency began as all the previous nights have, exploding out of the gates to raucous cheers with "So You Want To Be A Rock & Roll Star." 

    As Rolling Stone rock critic David Fricke commented in one of his extensive reviews of the first few Beacon shows, The Byrds cover has evolved night in and night out, especially Mike Campbell's guitar solo, which went from bouncy at the beginning of the week to a note-bending mind warp by Saturday. Saturday saw Tom and the guys' first stab at Into The Great Wide Open with a stellar "Two Gunslingers," along with selections from Hard Promises ("Woman In Love"), Wildflowers ("You Wreck Me," "Wildflowers"), You're Gonna Get It ("Listen To Her Heart"), Mojo ("I Should Have Known It," "Takin' My Time"), Damn the Torpedoes ("Refugee"), as well as from two of Tom's solo albums, Highway Companion ("Saving Grace ") and Full Moon Fever ("Love Is A Long Road," "Runnin' Down A Dream"). "Melinda" re-appeared, this time with Benmont Tench playing a much more staccato piano solo than the jazzy drums-and-keys fusion thing from earlier in the week.

    Saturday night was a big covers night though, and the crowd seemed to love watching the band dig deep into their bag of tricks. Tom and the band dipping back into the blues on "Baby Please Don't Go," a song written by Big Joe Williams and popularized by Van Morrison and Them. "We came out of a garage in Gainesville, FL and were listening to bands who came out of garages, too," Tom said before launching into a fuzzed out version of Paul Revere & the Raiders' "Steppin' Stone." "Friend of the Devil" made its second appearance of this run, and the Grateful Dead classic continues to evolve as well, with Tom playing more and more harmonica. Country music even got a nod with a cover of Conway Twitty's "The Image of Me," a song Tom said the band used to listen to on the radio riding back from gigs in FL in the early days.

     

    Last night at the Beacon tonight! Keep checking back for more!

     

    Set List

    Rock & Roll Star

    Love Is A Long Road

    Listen To Her Heart

    Baby Please Don't Go

    The Damage You've Done

    Takin' My Time

    Steppin' Stone

    Woman In Love

    Saving Grace

    Like To Love You Baby

    Tweeter And The Monkey Man

    Rebels

    Two Gunslingers

    Wildflowers

    The Image of Me

    Friend of the Devil

    Melinda

    I Should Have Known It

    Refugee

    Runnin' Down A Dream

     

    E: You Wreck Me

    American Girl

     

    Check Out Photos From The Show Here!

    43
Highway Companions's picture
on Sun, 2013-05-26 12:44

The fourth night of the Beacon residency began as all the previous nights have, exploding out of the gates to raucous cheers with "So You Want To Be A Rock & Roll Star." 

As Rolling Stone rock critic David Fricke commented in one of his extensive reviews of the first few Beacon shows, The Byrds cover has evolved night in and night out, especially Mike Campbell's guitar solo, which went from bouncy at the beginning of the week to a note-bending mind warp by Saturday. Saturday saw Tom and the guys' first stab at Into The Great Wide Open with a stellar "Two Gunslingers," along with selections from Hard Promises ("Woman In Love"), Wildflowers ("You Wreck Me," "Wildflowers"), You're Gonna Get It ("Listen To Her Heart"), Mojo ("I Should Have Known It," "Takin' My Time"), Damn the Torpedoes ("Refugee"), as well as from two of Tom's solo albums, Highway Companion ("Saving Grace ") and Full Moon Fever ("Love Is A Long Road," "Runnin' Down A Dream"). "Melinda" re-appeared, this time with Benmont Tench playing a much more staccato piano solo than the jazzy drums-and-keys fusion thing from earlier in the week.

Saturday night was a big covers night though, and the crowd seemed to love watching the band dig deep into their bag of tricks. Tom and the band dipping back into the blues on "Baby Please Don't Go," a song written by Big Joe Williams and popularized by Van Morrison and Them. "We came out of a garage in Gainesville, FL and were listening to bands who came out of garages, too," Tom said before launching into a fuzzed out version of Paul Revere & the Raiders' "Steppin' Stone." "Friend of the Devil" made its second appearance of this run, and the Grateful Dead classic continues to evolve as well, with Tom playing more and more harmonica. Country music even got a nod with a cover of Conway Twitty's "The Image of Me," a song Tom said the band used to listen to on the radio riding back from gigs in FL in the early days.

 

Last night at the Beacon tonight! Keep checking back for more!

 

Set List

Rock & Roll Star

Love Is A Long Road

Listen To Her Heart

Baby Please Don't Go

The Damage You've Done

Takin' My Time

Steppin' Stone

Woman In Love

Saving Grace

Like To Love You Baby

Tweeter And The Monkey Man

Rebels

Two Gunslingers

Wildflowers

The Image of Me

Friend of the Devil

Melinda

I Should Have Known It

Refugee

Runnin' Down A Dream

 

E: You Wreck Me

American Girl

 

Check Out Photos From The Show Here!

Comments

phillies03's picture

My family fights OCD, depression and bi-polar issues. At no point did I find what Petty said in his "weird girlfriend story" offensive. Call me a jerk, call me insensitive ... at what point do we stop being so sensitive about everything. I enjoyed the concert Saturday night ... just like every Petty concert I go to.

claude's picture

 I didn't call anyone a jerk-WE loved the concert too, nothing could change that-I just wish that depression and bipolar illness could be treated with the same empathy as other conditions and not a source of ridicule-because he is certainly a sensitive person, and one who champions human rights causes ( like the Amnesty International table in the Beacon lobby), so a person in his position can educate people, shine light on a subject, not perpetuate darkness.....

tphbfan's picture

being a long time fan (almost 30 years) i truly appreciated hearing THEIR rarely, if ever,played live songs but i could have done without so many covers.  i think 6 was a little too many. but each and every song they did sounded FANTASTIC, even if it was not one of their own.  i have never seen them in such an intimate venue and the acoustics were the best i have heard anywhere.  i won't go so far as to say i was disspointed in the show( how can that even be possible ?? ) but i would have enjoyed it EVEN MORE with less covers.  Rebels being done acoustic was not what i expected but was SO BEAUTIFUL.   Regarding the bipolar comments TP made early in the show, i know he didn't mean to hurt anyone, but it is a serious condition that affects a lot of people and he shouldn't have said what he did.  i was suprised and i'm sure some of the audience felt uncomfortable.  all things being said THE SHOW ROCKED, THE VENUE ROCKED, well worth the cost of our trip.  wish we could have stayed for Sunday night's show.  i can't wait for time number 10 --        

claude's picture

thanks for you response regarding the bipolar comments-I agree the rest of the show was amazing!

alamurphala's picture

What in heaven's name did he say? I for one would like to know what it was... people often say things about disorders such as this in my presence and my goal is to educate folks on mental illness and what pain it can cause families and folks afflicted with it...even Tom Petty if he needs such education.  He does not seem like an unkind person, so I doubt he would have meant any ill-will toward someone afflicted in such a way. Life is a struggle for everyone, but for folks with disorders like this, it's a special kind of hell.  Would someone who heard it all please just let us know the anecdote verbatim?  Thanks.

claude's picture

He was introducing a breakup song, and was really snide about saying "That woman was BIPOLAR! and she must've been off her meds!" then he says he put her on the train "and saw her little bipolar face" looking out the window of the train! My husband who was with me at the show (also, a long time fan) is a psychiatrist, and was just cringing at the ignorance perpetuated by someone who we think of as such a sensitive person and definitely NOT UNKIND-but he would never have said laughing" I saw her cancer ravaged face in the window" or made fun of any other serious illness, so why bipolar??????????? especially as a musician, he has to have been touched by losing creative vibrant friends/peers to untreated substance and mood disorders.

alamurphala's picture

Agreed...I don't think he meant it cruelly. But as one afflicted with this disease (and ON her meds) I have to say that many people have a picture of folks with this disorder, on meds or not, as completely irrational and thinking they can fly off buildings. Most of the time, people with this mood disorder are not on that end of the specturm. Off my meds?  I wouldn't be alive. On them I'm just fine (at least I think so!!)

Tom, there are lots of your fans, and perhaps even people in your own circle of family and friends, who suffer from certain issues such as this.  This disease does not present itself in such an obvious way as a tumor or lump. It's silent and insidious and hard to diagnose. On average, it is 10 or more years between the time it starts affecting your life negatively and when it gets diagnosed...if you survive that long.  Luckily, it's a treatable disease, a controllable one.  I'm usually not offended when people toss off this illness in a story or a pejorative remark because I understand that they don't know enough about it.  I am not offended, but take a few minutes to think about this and find out more about this illness. As one who suffered from it and still does, I think it's important that not only you but everyone understands it a little better.  I'm not ashamed of it...anymore than someone with cancer is ashamed of that. I tell my students, I tell my friends...because they need to understand.

And on a side note, during the miserable times in my life when I felt there was little hope and there was no medication, your music helped me through that. Thank you.

samwhitmore's picture

For those who care about such things, "I'm Not Your Stepping Stone" was done by the Monkees, not Paul Revere & the Raiders. I'm old enough to remember! :-)

stevekimmerer's picture

That's actually false. It was first recorded by Paul Revere and the Raiders. Written by Boyce and Hart, it was recorded by PR&TR 6 months before the monkees recorded it.

samwhitmore's picture

Wow! OK, I stand corrected. Thanks for the info, Steve.

claude's picture

Tom-the Saturday night show at the Beacon was amazing- but the bipolar comments and subsequent jokes were mean spirited and uncharacteristic-my husband and I really love your music (drove 400 miles for the show)-he is a psychiatrist and has been treating people suffering from depression and other illnesses including bipolar for over 20 years. You have surely been close to people who have also suffered from substance abuse, which is often a result of untreated depression. Suicide is never funny.I do not think you would ridicule people suffering from cancer or other chronic  illnesses-so the laughter from the audience at your bipolar story was uncomfortable and painful-many in the audience who truly love and respect you know someone in their lives who  suffers from this. You are a great storyteller,the anecdote and song could have been amusing without the wisecracking about the girl's little bipolar face. Please consider this! Otherwise, we loved the show and so happy to see you sharing so much music that has meant a lot to you, and hope you will come back to the Beacon again!

honeykbee's picture

Country got a nod, alright. Kickass rock, no fiddle!

dolstein's picture

I was at Saturday's show, as well as the Monday show, and I enjoyed them both.  I do wish TP would stop ending his shows with American Girl - keep us all in suspense a little longer.

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